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Monday, 14 January 2019 00:00

Foot and Ankle Surgery

When conservative, noninvasive methods prove ineffective, surgery may be selected as the next course of action for the treatment of your foot or ankle condition.  A wide number of foot and ankle surgical procedures exist, and it is up to your podiatrist to determine which intervention will be most appropriate and helpful for your case.  Some surgical procedures include bunion surgery, fusion, hammertoe surgery, heel spur surgery, metatarsal surgery, nail surgery, neuroma surgery, reconstructive surgery, skin surgery, and tendon surgery.  Typically, surgery is turned to as a definitive way to alleviate excessive pain or discomfort and to return your foot to full mobility.

Regardless of the location on the body, all surgical procedures require preoperative testing and examination to ensure the surgery’s success and preferred outcome.  A review of your medical history and medical conditions will take place, as will an evaluation of any current diseases, illnesses, allergies, and medications.  Tests such as blood studies, urinalyses, EKG, X-rays, and blood flow studies may be ordered.  Because the procedure involves the foot and/or ankle, the structures of your feet while walking may also be observed by your podiatrist.

Care post-surgery will depend on the type of surgical procedure performed.  Typically, all postoperative care involves rest, ice, compression, and elevation.  To improve and ensure a safe recovery, your foot and ankle surgeon may also employ the use of bandages, splints, surgical shoes, casts, crutches, or canes.  He will also determine if and when you can bear weight.  A timely and thorough recovery is a priority for both you and your podiatrist, and carefully following postoperative instructions can help achieve this.  

Monday, 07 January 2019 00:00

Choosing the Right Running Shoe

Choosing the right running shoes for you is an important part of running. A good pair of running shoes will make the running experience more enjoyable for you and prevent potential injury.

Poorly-fitted shoes can increase the risk of injury in runners substantially. Common injuries from running with poor quality shoes include shin splints, sprained ankles, Achilles tendinitis, stress fractures, plantar fasciitis and more. This is due to the fact that bad shoes do not provide proper foot support, can increase pronation (how much the foot rolls when hitting the ground), have little to no cushioning, do not allow the feet to breath, and do not provide enough flex and rigidity in the right parts.

When looking for running shoes, first, determine where you will be running. If you are a trail runner, then pick trail shoes. If you run on concrete and asphalt, then regular running shoes are the best choice. When trying on shoes, its best to go at the end of the day as feet grow during the day and shrink after a night of sleep. Shoes should be more rigid towards the back of the foot while being more flexible up where the toes are. The toe box should provide enough room for the toes to move freely. The overall fit should be snug, not too tight but not too loose. A good pair of running shoes should also provide enough arch support for your foot type. If you experience overpronation or under-pronation while running, try to find a pair of shoes that will help correct this with different sole patterns.  Finally, try to find a pair of shoes that allow the feet to breathe like nylon mesh or synthetic leather.

Don’t forget about the socks either. Socks that hold too much moisture can lead to athlete’s foot. Socks should be breathable so that your feet can air out and breathe. Synthetic socks wick away moisture like sweat. If you tend to run a lot, having a second pair of shoes that you can wear while you let the first pair air out is smart. Just don’t forget to replace your shoes after about every 300 to 500 miles.

Before you start running, it is advised to see a podiatrist to see if running is right for you. They can also offer good advice on how to run and what to look for in a pair of running shoes. If you have flat feet or poorly supported ones, they can also offer custom-made orthotics that will help give your feet the support they need.

The purpose of the body’s circulation system is to transport blood, oxygen, and nutrients throughout the body. A reduction of blood to a specific part of the body may cause one to experience symptoms of poor circulation. The most common causes of poor circulation in the feet are obesity, diabetes, and heart conditions such as peripheral artery disease (PAD). Common symptoms of poor circulation include tingling, numbness, throbbing, pain and muscle cramps.

Peripheral artery disease is a common cause of poor circulation in the legs. Symptoms of PAD are cramping, pain or tiredness in the leg or hip muscles while walking or climbing stairs. This pain tends to go away with rest and starts back up when you begin to walk.  It is a condition that causes the blood vessels and arteries to become narrow. Although PAD is more common in adults over the age of 50, it may also occur in younger people.  A similar condition called atherosclerosis causes arteries to stiffen up due to a buildup of plaque in the arteries and blood vessels.

Blood clots are also a common cause of poor circulation in the feet. Clots may obstruct blood vessels and if they occur in the legs, they may eventually lead to pain and discoloration. This occurrence is commonly known as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and it may travel to the lungs. Varicose veins are another condition that may lead to poor circulation, and it is caused by incompetence of the valves in the veins. Women who are overweight are prone to developing this condition. Lastly, diabetes, which is correlated with poor blood sugar metabolism may lead to chronic poor circulation. Those with diabetes often suffer from cramping in the legs, calves, thighs and buttocks.

If you are looking for ways to avoid poor circulation there are some tips you can follow. One tip is to avoid sitting for too long. If you plan to sit down for a long period of time, you should try standing up occasionally, to improve your circulation. Another great way to avoid poor circulation is to exercise. Exercise is an excellent way to pump the heart and increase blood flow. Those who suffer from poor circulation should also avoid smoking, reduce their salt intake, and try to lose weight.

If you are experiencing symptoms from poor circulation in your feet, you should consult with your podiatrist to determine the best method for treatment for you. He or she may prescribe medication in addition to recommending specific lifestyle changes to improve your circulation.

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